<![CDATA[Secunda: a documentary - Blog]]>Sat, 02 Jan 2016 07:07:42 -0800Weebly<![CDATA[The Secunda Piano Suite]]>Sat, 19 Dec 2015 21:58:13 GMThttp://secunda.weebly.com/blog/the-secunda-piano-suitePlease help support the Arthur Secunda Documentary with a purchase of the Secunda Piano Suite composed by Matteo Marchisano-Adamo.  All proceeds will go to help produce the documentary.  The album consists of piano pieces inspired by the artwork of Arthur Secunda.  
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<![CDATA[More Correspondence Art: Ray Johnson to Arthur Secunda]]>Tue, 08 Dec 2015 19:17:25 GMThttp://secunda.weebly.com/blog/more-correspondence-art-ray-johnson-to-arthur-secunda
Arthur Secunda and Ray Johnson were childhood friends.  Here you can see some correspondence art between the two.  These were taken during the shooting of the first phase of the documentary on Arthur Secunda in Secunda's Boulder, CO studio.
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<![CDATA[Stills from Documentary on Arthur Secunda]]>Fri, 13 Nov 2015 00:31:38 GMThttp://secunda.weebly.com/blog/stills-from-documentary-on-arthur-secunda
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<![CDATA[Arthur Secunda Documentary Teaser (Numéro deux)]]>Thu, 12 Nov 2015 00:38:41 GMThttp://secunda.weebly.com/blog/arthur-secunda-documentary-teaser-numero-deux]]><![CDATA[Arthur Secunda Documentary Teaser (Numéro un)]]>Thu, 12 Nov 2015 00:34:33 GMThttp://secunda.weebly.com/blog/arthur-secunda-documentary-teaser-numero-un]]><![CDATA[Secunda and NASA]]>Fri, 06 Nov 2015 02:58:02 GMThttp://secunda.weebly.com/blog/secunda-and-nasaStills from the documentary on Arthur Secunda
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<![CDATA[Interview with Matteo Marchisano-Adamo for Arthur Secunda Documentary]]>Wed, 21 Oct 2015 15:38:08 GMThttp://secunda.weebly.com/blog/interview-with-matteo-marchisano-adamo-for-arthur-secunda-documentary]]><![CDATA[The Young Arthur Secunda]]>Tue, 20 Oct 2015 03:33:44 GMThttp://secunda.weebly.com/blog/the-young-arthur-secunda
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<![CDATA[Childhood Friends]]>Mon, 19 Oct 2015 18:11:00 GMThttp://secunda.weebly.com/blog/childhood-friendsHere, two childhood friends, see each other after a long time. Henry told me in an interview that he studied photography because of Arthur's suggestion. Henry eventually became a film director and producer.
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<![CDATA[To Live in High Places]]>Tue, 13 Oct 2015 21:30:54 GMThttp://secunda.weebly.com/blog/to-live-in-high-placesby C. Edward Wall
​Always stretching the boundaries of his work, Arthur Secunda began experimenting in the late 1980s with crushed monoprints. He found that if he cranked down the rollers on an etching press, paper would build up and wrinkle under the rollers. Painting a plate and printing it once with rollers properly adjusted so the paper would not wrinkle, Secunda would then readjust the rollers to intentionally wrinkle the work, which he would print again in its wrinkled state. When the print was dry, he would stretch the work, opening up the wrinkles to expose portions of the image that were printed initially but were not printed during the second pass. The resulting monoprints revealed texture, stratification, and rich coloration closely reflecting the beauty and serendipity found in nature.

Taking a break from his studio, Secunda and his photographer friend, Eric Lawton, made a trip to photograph the cliff dwellings at Camp Verde, Arizona. As Secunda was studying the resulting photographs, he was struck by the texture and linear quality of one of the images, recalling that the elements closely resembled those in one of his monoprints. Superimposing the photograph on the monoprint, the works merged perfectly, resulting in a very special collage.

Secunda was inspired by the collage to create a suite of three powerful prints, which reflect beliefs inherent to the Enlightenment, the ideals of democracy, and the very essence of Native American cultures - that to "live well" on earth, humankind must vigilantly strive to establish, maintain, and protect the lofty and often elusive values of freedom and justice as well as that "special spirit," which causes humankind, in the first place, to think, to reason, and, subsequently, to choose pursuit of goodness and high values.

The central image in each print is a collaged photograph of a cliff dwelling at Camp Verde. Those who occupied these dwellings were agricultural peoples. They lived high on the cliff, literally sheltered from sustained attack. Yet these peoples disappeared without apparent reason; to this day, their disappearance is one of the great mysteries in American archeology. In this context, To Live in High Places also is a seminal reminder of the importance of seeking understanding and implementing practices requisite to preserving the life-sustaining capacity of Earth.
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